GEIRANGER: Over Gaularfjellet’s hairpins to Norway’s most famous Fjord

   Dramatic and diverse, beautiful, and breathtaking.

We are about to enter some of Norway’s most stunning landscapes! Hairpins, pouring rain, freezing temperatures – nothing could stop us before reaching Norway’s most famous fjord: Geiranger. (orchestral music) Good morning from Balestrand.

Today is maybe one of the most exciting days because we will visit some of Norway’s most famous sites. And our first big stop is Gaularfjellet, which is not as famous as our second stop, but which is supposed to be a fantastic ride over curvy hairpin roads.

With thousands of kilometers of extremely irregular coastline, the ocean is never far in Norway. In many places, deep fjords reach far into the country. That’s why Norway is called “The Country of Fjords”. There are about 1,190 fjords in Norway. And before heading up to the Gaular Mountains, the route took us along two of them.

Esefjorden is close to Balestrand. The road circles the narrow fjord, which is surrounded by 1000 meter high mountains, which fall steeply into the fjord and leave only a little room for the road. (bright music) The road to Gaularfjellet continues along Vetlefjord.

It’s carved into the steep mountains and runs along the water. – Now we’re hitting the road to Gaularfjellet and the hairpin fun starts. (upbeat music) Surrounded by the 1,650 meters high Gaular Mountains, nine steep hairpins lead up to an altitude of about 800 meters and to the platform Utsikten, which translated means “the view”.

And what a view it was! (bells tinkling) But wait, didn’t I just promise you a breathtaking view? (dramatic music) – It’s breathtaking views up here and even we’re not so high, compared to, for example, high Alpine roads, it’s freezing here and there’s still snow.

So I guess that’s how I realized that we’re so much further north now than, for example, Germany. The road follows the Gaularvassdraget, the protected Gaular watercourse known for its many waterfalls and floating rivers.

This is also super, super, pretty Norwegian wilderness that we’re driving today. We have been driving for hours around the fjords and over the mountains. (engine roaring) On our way to the famous Geirangerfjord, we first came across another fjord, Innvikfjorden, which is the eastern part of Nordfjord, that is 106 kilometers long. And we realized that enjoying the view of a fjord gets never old.

We are on our way now to the famous Geirangerfjord and we go over Loen and kind of like skiing places. So this is a fjord/lake behind me and it’s pretty beautiful. (dramatic music) Now we’re really on our way to Geiranger and its beautiful mountains. (bright music) – We’re climbing up the mountains toward Geirangerfjord now.

Unfortunately, it gets super foggy here at the moment, and I really hope this is not ruining our views on the fjord. (string music) The road to Geirangerfjord was much busier than all other roads that we had taken before. And we learned an important lesson.

If it rains in Norway, it pours. Just before leaving Geiranger, disappointed, because we could barely see anything in the rain, we reached Ørnesvingen Viewpoint and the rain magically stopped. We realized why Geiranger is one of Norway’s most popular sights.

The ride from Geiranger took us through some more amazing mountains. And to another ferry. Over another fjord, Storfjord. (piano music) Thanks for accompanying me to some of Norway’s most spectacular views.

The next episode will take us to Ålesund and Norway’s famous Atlantic Ocean Road. Pack your raincoats and join the journey. And don’t forget to subscribe to my channel and leave a comment and a thumbs up.

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Today is maybe one of the most exciting days because we will visit some of Norway’s most famous sites. And our first big stop is Gaularfjellet, which is not as famous as our second stop, but which is supposed to be a fantastic ride over curvy hairpin roads.

With thousands of kilometers of extremely irregular coastline, the ocean is never far in Norway. In many places, deep fjords reach far into the country. That’s why Norway is called “The Country of Fjords”. There are about 1,190 fjords in Norway. And before heading up to the Gaular Mountains, the route took us along two of them.

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